C. P. Mudd
†C.P. (Charles Patrick) Mudd (1944–2005) was born to a small, rural Catholic family in Lebanon, Kentucky. Music was always an interest from his youngest days, but there were few outlets for it.

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Bio

†C.P. (Charles Patrick) Mudd (1944–2005) was born to a small, rural Catholic family in Lebanon, Kentucky. Music was always an interest from C.P.’s youngest days, but there were few outlets for it. By college age and at the encouragement of his teacher, the renowned liturgist Father Gene Walsh, C.P. directed his college choir and by graduation had begun composing for the new English liturgy. It was from teachers such as Fr. Walsh, Fr. Louis Reitz and Jim Burns that he learned not only choir and cantor ministries in worship, but also the theology, norms and pastoral practice of good parish worship.

Trained in Latin chants and vernacular music, C.P. earned a master of divinity degree from St. Mary Seminary in Baltimore. Composers such as Gelineau, Deiss, Twynham, Wise, Miffleton, Blunt, Landry and many others over the years inspired and encouraged him to write songs for worship and catechesis. He contributed to or fully composed five collections of original songs for Catholic worship. OCP is the exclusive licensing agent for his treasured music.

C.P. also co-wrote a book with Dr. Fred Moleck entitled Daily Praise. It is a pastoral adaptation of morning and evening prayer for parish use.

He served as the executive director of the Liturgical Commission of the Archdiocese of Louisville for eight years and, during that time, spent several years as a member of the Federation of Diocesan Liturgical Commissions (FDLC).

C.P. conducted many music and liturgy workshops across the country and in his home diocese of Louisville, where he created, animated, instructed and developed many choirs, cantors and music ensembles for parish worship. His goal was to create accessible music that engages the assembly to pray in song-reflecting both the ritual being celebrated as well as the seasons, moods, movements, and prayer moments of the worship experience.

He lived in Louisville with his wife, Bernadette, where he continued to serve until his death in March 2005 as a composer, minister of music and liturgical mentor to local parishes, liturgists and music ministers.